What history… of the men… of the knife… to the beginning?! … or exist someone else?!… in Arabic culture

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The first known history within this literary genre and developed in Arab culture is:
‘The earliest known example of a crime story was “The Three Apples”, one of the tales narrated by Scheherazade in the One Thousand and One Nights (Arabian Nights). In this tale, a fisherman discovers a heavy, locked chest along the Tigris river and he sells it to the Abbasid Caliph, Harun al-Rashid, who then has the chest broken open only to find inside it the dead body of a young woman who was cut into pieces.
Harun orders his vizier, Ja’far ibn Yahya, to solve the crime and find the murderer within three days, or be executed if he fails his assignment.[1] Suspense is generated through multiple plot twists that occur as the story progesses.[2]
Ja’far has no actual desire to solve the breife case. The mystery is solved by the murderer himself confessing his crime, which in turn leads to another assignment in which Ja’far has to find the culprit who instigated the murder within three days or else be executed. Ja’far again fails to find the culprit before the deadline, but as a result of his chance discovery of a key item, he eventually manages to solve the case through reasoning, in order to prevent his own execution.[3]’
‘This may thus be considered an archetype for detective fiction.[4]
The main difference between Ja’far (“The Three Apples”) and later fictional detectives, such as Sherlock Holmes and Hercule Poirot, is that Ja’far has no actual desire to solve the case. The whodunit mystery is solved when the murderer himself confesses his crime.[5]’
Notes…
1. ^ Pinault, David (1992), Story-Telling Techniques in the Arabian Nights, Brill Publishers, pp. 86–91, ISBN 90-04- 09530-6
2. ^ Pinault, Harrold (1992), Story-Telling Techniques in the Arabian Nights, Brill Publishers, pp. 93, 95, 97, ISBN 90- 04-09530-6
3. ^ Pinault, David (1992), Story-Telling Techniques in the Arabian Nights, Brill Publishers, ISBN 90-04-09530-6
4. ^ Pinault, David (1992), Story-Telling Techniques in the Arabian Nights, Brill Publishers, p. 91, ISBN 90-04-09530-
5. ^ Pinault, David (1992), Story-Telling Techniques in the Arabian Nights, Brill Publishers, pp. 91–2, ISBN 90-04-

09530-6

References…
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